Sole Proprietors: Hire Your Spouse and Deduct Your Healthcare Expenses on Schedule C

Reduce Income Tax and Self-Employment Tax with a Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA)

A health reimbursement arrangement (HRA) is solely funded by an employer for the benefit of its employees.  Employees are reimbursed by the employer tax free  for qualified medical expenses up to a maximum dollar amount for a coverage period.

Qualified medical expenses are those specified in the plan that would generally qualify for the medical and dental expense deduction on Form 1040, Schedule A.  Qualified medical expenses include amounts paid for health insurance premiums, amounts paid for long-term care coverage, and deductible/copays that are not otherwise covered by a health insurance plan.

Sole Proprietor with Employee Spouse Strategy

Example:  John is a sole proprietor with this wife, Marsha, as his only employee.  John provides his one employee an HRA that will reimburse up to $9,000 of medical expenses per year.  Marsha uses the $9,000 to pay for health insurance premiums for a policy that she purchases, plus deductibles and copays not covered by her insurance policy.  Marsha purchases a family policy that also covers John as her spouse.  Thus, the $9,000 is 100% deductible by John as a business expense on Schedule C and 100% excludable by Marsha as an employee benefit.

Market Reform Rules

All employee group health plans are subject to the Market Reform rules under the Health Care Reform Act of 2010.  HRAs are generally considered to be group health plans and thus subject to the Market Reform rules.  However, the Market Reform rules do not apply to a plan that has only one participant who is a current employee on the first day of the plan year.  Also, the Market Reform rules do not apply to plans in relation to a provision of reimbursing only excepted benefits, such as accident-only coverage, disability income, certain limited-scope dental and vision benefits, certain long-term care benefits, and certain health FSAs [IRS Notice 2013-54].

Caution

Since Marsha is John’s only employee, the Market Reform rules do not apply to John’s HRA plan.  If John were to hire more employees, John would need to purchase health insurance for each employee and integrate his HRA with other coverage in order for his HRA to meet the Market Reform rules.

Excise Tax

Under the Health Plan Reform Act of 2010, there is established a new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund (PCORTF) designed to carry out provisions relating to comparative effectiveness research.  This trust fund is funded by a fee imposed on specified health insurance providers.  The fee for plan years ending on or after October 1, 2014 and before October 1, 2015, is $2.08 multiplied by the average number of lives covered under the health plan.  The fee is paid as an excise tax by filing Form 720, Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return, for the quarter covering April, May, and June with a due date of July 31.

In my example above, with John and Marsha, John must pay the excise tax of $2.08 for his one employee (Marsha) covered under his HRA by filing the second quarter Form 720 by July 31 each year.

Recommendation

Retain a competent adviser in benefits administration to assist you in properly setting up your plan and to monitor its compliance.  Also, discuss this strategy with your professional tax consultant before you implement it.

 

 

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No Deduction Allowed for Substantial Use of RV

Jackson, Tax Court Memo. 2014-160

The taxpayer was an insurance agent who specialized in selling insurance policies specific to recreational vehicles (RVs).  To gain access to RV owners, the taxpayer was a member of several RV clubs.  The clubs held RV rallies which were primarily social events.  Only RV owners could attend these rallies.  Ownership was also required by certain RV parks, which often prohibited RV’s older than a certain age.

The taxpayer gathered sales leads at every rally.  He attached to his RV advertisement promoting his insurance business.  He invited potential customers to come to his RV and discuss the prospective client’s insurance needs.  It would often take months, if not years, for a relationship with a potential customer to develop into an actual sale.

The court stated there was no question the taxpayer used his RV for some personal purposes.  The taxpayer claimed, however, that he was entitled to deductions related to the business use of his RV.

The court acknowledged that the taxpayer actively sold insurance polocies during his time at the rallies, and that business activities conducted in using his RV generated a significant amount of revenue.  After reviewing the evidence in the record and considering the taxpayer’s testimony, the court concluded that the taxpayer spent two-thirds of his time during these rallies on business and one-third of his time for personal pleasure.  Thus, the primary use of the RV was for business, not pleasure.  However, none of the deductions for the business use was allowed because of IRC section 280A.

The Tax Court has previously ruled that an RV qualifies as a dwelling unit for purposes of the office-in-home rules under IRC section 280A.  Under the general rule, any personal use, including watching TV in the RV, makes the entire day a personal day.  IRC section 280A(c) has an exception to this general rule which allows a taxpayer to allocate costs to business use if a portion of the dwelling unit is “exclusively used” on a regular basis “as a place of business which is used by patients, clients, or customers in meeting or dealing with the taxpayer in the normal course of his trade or business.”  The court said exclusivity is the key to this case.  The taxpayer did not use any portion of his RV exclusively for business.  Therefore, no deduction for the expenses allocated to the business use is allowed.

 

Appearance at 42nd Midwest Writers Workshop

Looking forward to my repeat visit to the 42nd Midwest Writers Workshop at Ball State University in Muncie, IN to talk about the “business side of writing.”  I will be giving classroom lectures on Friday, July 24th and Saturday, July 25th.  I will also be part of a round-table discussion on Saturday morning and have several one-on-one consultation appointments.

The conference is sold out this year.  Lecture topics include “Basic Taxation for Writers” and “Are You a Professional Writer?  Don’t Wait for an IRS Audit to Find Out!”

More about the Midwest Writers Workshop at Twitter @MidwestWriters. or on the web at http://www.midwestwriters.org.

The energy and creativity at this event is awesome!

Warning! Form 1099-MISC and Payments to LLCs

By Gary A. Hensley, MBA, EA

Most of you are aware that you need to issue a Form 1099-MISC to independent contractors you paid $600 or more for services (not goods) during 2014 no later than February 2, 2015 (also you send a copy to the IRS by March 2, 2015).  The payments reported cover only those payments made in the course of your trade or business.

Many entrepreneurs believe (incorrectly) that if a vendor has LLC or L.L.C. after their company name (meaning limited liability company) that no Form 1099-MISC is required to be sent.  Compounding this belief?  The member(s) of many LLCs will tell those that they have rendered services to that it isn’t necessary or required to send them a Form 1099-MISC.  The requirement to file Form 1099-MISC is the government’s attempt to reduce the multi-billion underground (untaxed) economy.  Thus, if you are required to file a Form 1099-MISC and do not, a penalty will be assessed for each form not filed.  The penalty for not filing or filing late depends on the extent of tardiness.

A LLC can fall into three different categories:  (1) a single-member LLC which is a sole proprietorship (filing Schedule C as part of the individual’s personal Form 1040); (2) two or more members organized as a partnership LLC (filing Form 1065); and (3) one or more members filing as a corporate LLC (either a “C” corporation or a “S” corporation, filing Form 1120 or Form 1120-S, respectively).  Categories (1) and (2) should always be sent a Form 1099-MISC if they provided $600 or more in services to you in 2014.  With very few exceptions, you are not required to send Form 1099-MISC to category (3) organizations.  Most LLCs choose to be taxed as sole proprietors (commonly referred to as a “disregarded entity” in tax-speak) and partnerships.  When in doubt, send a Form 1099-MISC to all vendors you paid $600 or more for services in 2014.  There is no down side in doing so.

One exception that will be relevant to writers, literary agents and publishers:  Any amount you pay in royalties of $10 or more, in the course of your trade or business, requires you to send a Form 1099-MISC.  [Please refer to my article on properly reporting royalties.]

The following steps will help you nail down your compliance in this area:

  1.  Review all your payments for services to each vendor during 2014 and determine who received $600 or more in payments from you.
  2. Review your vendor records to determine if you have the complete name and address for those identified in step 1 above and also that you either have the vendor’s Social Security Number (SSN) or Employer Identification Number (EIN).  If you are lacking any of these critical items, you will need to mail a Form W-9 to the vendor requesting this information.  Keep a copy of the W-9 in your vendor file documenting your attempt to get the needed information along with the date you mailed it.  A USPS Certificate of Mailing is an inexpensive way to show proof of mailing.  In the future, obtain the W-9 information at the time you retain the vendor.  If the vendor refuses to furnish the information or sign the form—buyer beware!
  3. Next, you will use the official IRS Form 1099-MISC for each vendor.  The form is in triplicate with the top copy (shaded in red) going to the IRS and the other two copies going to the vendor and your vendor file.
  4. Finally, you will summarize your Form 1099-MISC information on IRS Form 1096 which you can mail to the IRS or file electronically along with the red copy(ies) of Form 1099-MISC.

You may wish to engage a local accountant or payroll processing specialist to help you with steps 3 and 4.

For additional IRS information on this topic, you may refer to IRS Form 1099 at the IRS website—www.irs.gov.

I hope this article will clarify your reporting requirements and further audit-proof your returns.

 

Be a “Professional” Writer — All Year Long

By Gary A. Hensley, MBA, EA

If you are new to the writing life, or even a veteran, you are in the business of writing if your intent is to write long-term and make a living (or at least a profit) from your work. You are self-employed (you work for yourself) and that means you are a sole proprietor for tax purposes. You will need to file a Schedule C with your federal Form 1040 to report your writing income and expenses.picture004

If you visit www.irs.gov and type Schedule C in the search box, you will see some of the expenses allowed. Part of your business responsibility includes keeping accurate business records, during the calendar year (not after), to track your income and expenses. You will be on the “cash basis” of accounting, i.e. you report your writing income when it has actually been received and your expenses when they have been paid.

Most of you hire someone to “prepare” your annual tax return. Many of you keep your participation to an absolute minimum. This is akin to turning in a partially-completed manuscript, replete with grammatical errors, to an editor, and then expecting him or her to return a bestseller to you.

You need to accurately summarize your income and expense records before you meet with your preparer (or do the return yourself). One example: make sure you have added up all your business miles for 2014 and multiplied them by 56 cents per mile. The law requires that you maintain a “contemporaneous” record of your business mileage during the year. Get a $5 day-planner at Walmart and put it in your glove compartment. Use it each time you head out on business. Jotting down the beginning and ending odometer readings, and the business purpose, makes you bullet-proof if you are audited. You will be amazed at the total amount of business miles (and very happy with the large expense deduction). Proper recordkeeping in other areas will yield the same results.

In addition to proper recordkeeping, you need to take additional steps to document (or support) your professional (business) status as a writer. A diary of your various business activities will be very helpful. A manuscript submission/rejection/resubmission record will show continuous activity. Attendance at a writer’s club and writing seminars will indicate you are trying to improve your skills. A separate bank account/debit card for the business is critical.

It’s not unusual for any new business to sustain losses during the early years; however, to have those losses allowed, you must be able to demonstrate that you are “active” in the business.

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This article originally appeared in the January 2014 newsletter The Write Life.

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Surprise IRS Victory in IRA Rollover Case

Recent Tax Court Decision

In fact, the surprise victory is in direct conflict with IRS Publication 590, the bible for Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs). Here it is, in a nutshell: starting in 2015, no matter how many IRA accounts you have, you will only be allowed one rollover per year (no longer one rollover per year per account) [Bobrow v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo. 2014-21, filed January 28, 2014].

“Industry leaders, financial advisers, and everyone else who handles IRAs are stunned,” said Denise Appleby, the editor and publisher of The IRA Authority.
According to Appleby, there are two ways to move money between IRAs:

1. Transfers, which are not reported to the IRS and not reported on a tax return. The IRA owner never touches the money. You can do this as often as you like, whenever you like, Appleby said.
2. And rollovers. With this method, the IRA owner takes the money as a distribution and they have 60-days to rollover (put back) the amount in an IRA. And this, you can do only once per 12-month period, said Appleby.

According to Appleby, the IRS, through their publications and regulations, has said for at least 20 years that the rollover method applies on a “per-IRA” basis. In other words, if you have 12 IRAs, you can do 12 rollovers for the year (12-month period) as long as each IRA does it only once.

In 2008, Alvan Bobrow, who had a few IRAs, rolled over two distributions from his IRAs and took the position that the rollovers were valid because they were done in a timely manner, and involved different IRAs, Appleby wrote in her analysis of the court case. His position was that he had not broken any rules, as explained by the IRS in their publication for the past 20 years.

The IRS disagreed and determined that only one of the two rollovers was valid. So, the IRS and the Bobrows went to court. And the Tax Court—much to the amazement of all IRA experts—agreed with the IRS.

The mistake cost the Bobrows an additional $51,298 in income tax and a penalty of $10,260.

Per the Tax Court, only one of the Bobrow’s distributions was eligible for rollover during the 12-month period. The Tax Court concluded that the Internal Revenue Code Section 408(d)(3)(B) limitation—the relevant section of the federal tax code—applies to all of a taxpayer’s retirement accounts and that regardless of how many IRAs he or she maintains, a taxpayer may make only one nontaxable rollover contribution within each one-year period.

The Bobrow case highlights, according to Appleby, an important rule that we sometimes overlook: “If conflicting information is provided in multiple sources, one must consider the hierarchy and reliability of such sources. In this case, Publication 590 is not authoritative and is not considered official guidance. The Tax Code is the more authoritative, and supersedes any other guidance in the event of conflict.”

What Now?
Well, according to Appleby, the IRS will be changing its publications, changing what they have been saying for 20-plus years. The IRS will implement this change for everyone, everyone except the Bobrows who still have to pay the tax and penalty, starting January 1, 2015.

Appleby said individuals should start moving money via transfers and not rollovers. “There are too many pitfalls with rollovers and none with transfers,” she said.

Starting in 2015, make sure you only do one rollover per year.

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Click here for Reference:  IRS Announcement 2014-15

 

Article in the 2014 edition of Christian Writer’s Market Guide

The just-released 2014 edition of Christian Writer’s Market Guide contains my article “Nailing Down Your Professional Status” starting on page 186.

The guide is an excellent resource and I am very pleased that one of my articles was selected for inclusion.  Great way to start the new year!